Raleigh Redux iE Electric Bike Review Part 1 – Pictures & Specs

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike 2The sporty Raleigh Redux iE mid-drive speed pedelec (28 mph) has arrived for testing & review!

A high torque Brose mid-drive with a nearly 500 watt hour integrated frame battery powers this agile commuter up to 28 mph. 

At $3,199 the Redux features a well designed frame and a solid component line up from Brose, Shimano, Schwalbe, and more. 

In this first part of the review you will get a detailed look at this bike with a BUNCH of pictures and the specifications.

Part 2 of the Raleigh Redux iE review will give you info on the ride characteristics, results from the range test, pros, cons, and overall thoughts on this eBike.

Alright, let’s take a closer look at the Raleigh Redux iE!

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike 2

The Raleigh Redux iE is a stealthy commuter that is also a great eBike for long weekend rides through the country. It also has the capabilities to become a solid touring eBike for longer adventures. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery frame

Raleigh put a lot of thought into the design and construction 6061 aluminum Redux iE frame. Here is a look at the clean integration of the battery into the downtube of the frame. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike headtube

The headtube has been formed to provide strength where its needed while reducing the material in lower stress areas for weight savings. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike headtube 2

You can see more of that in this side view of the headtube. Also note the smoothed welds that create a clean look with the tubes flowing together. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike seat tube top tube

The seat tube, top tube, and seat stay junction also has the smoothed welds. There are attachments for a rear rack on the frame. In this view you can see the upper rack attachments at the seat stays.

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike seat tube weld motor

This is the seat tube connection at the mid-drive motor mount. The hydroformed tubing has been shaped to provide a large surface area connection for added strength and stability. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike brose mid drive motor

The 250 watt Brose mid-drive motor provides the pedal assist up to 28 mph and it has a peak torque of 90 Nm. This pedal assist system uses a torque sensor.

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike brose motor

And here is a look at the left side of the Brose mid-drive motor. The motor is fully enclosed in the aluminum frame for protection. 

Here is a video from Brose that gives you a look inside this mid-drive motor: 

Brose has its roots in automotive components “Our years of experience as a specialist for mechatronics systems and as a global market leader for electric motors in the automotive sector, were the optimal preconditions for developing an innovative motor concept for high-quality e-bikes. We brought the entire team together within an e-bike centre of excellence at the Brose engine plant in Berlin. Production of the drive system takes place at the Brose manufacturing plant in Berlin.”

The basis for the Brose eBike motor is a steering motor produced millions of times over for cars.
Raleigh Redux iE electric bike class 3 speed pedelecThe Raleigh Redux iE is a Class 3 electric bike per California law which is a speed pedelec providing pedal assist up to 28 mph.

 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery

The 36V 13.8ah (496.8 Wh) lithium battery is mounted inside the downtube of the frame providing a low and centered weight distribution, which is good for overall bike handling.

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike charging port 1

The battery pack charging port is located at the top of the pack near the headtube. There is a magnetic charging port cover that is easily removed for charging (cover removed in this picture). The battery can be charged on or off the bike. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery keys

The stylish on/off button is located at the bottom of the pack and the battery is removed by unlocking it from the frame with the supplied key (2 keys supplied) and lifting the pack out of the downtube. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery removed

Here’s a look at the frame after the battery pack has been removed. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery removed headtube

This is the connection point for the battery near the headtube of the frame. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike battery charger

The battery can be charged on or off the bike and the charging port is at the top of the battery pack. The charger is about the size of a laptop charger and it takes 4 to 5 hours to charge a completely empty battery. 

The battery pack weighs 6.7 pounds. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike fork cable routing

The aluminum fork has a thru axle for solid side to side wheel stability. The internal cable routing is a nice way to provide some protection for the hydraulic disc brake cable and it looks pretty cool too! There are connection points for fenders and a front rack. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike brose display

In the center of the handlebar is the Brose LCD display that shows the pedal assist level (there are 3 levels), speedometer, odometer, trip odometer, battery level, trip time, trip average speed, and current time.  

The display has a backlit for good visibility both day and night. There is also a button to control front and rear lights (not included) that can be added to the Redux iE and they run off of the main eBike battery. The Brose system is designed so that even if the battery does not have enough charge for pedal assist, it will still provide 2 hours for the light system. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike display mount usb

The display can be easily removed from the handlebar mount by pushing down on a tab and sliding the display off. There is also a way to fix the display to the mount with an optional fastening bolt. At the base of the display mount is a USB charging port for charging a smartphone, tablet, or other USB chargeable device from the eBike battery. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike control pad 1

A simple control pad on the left side of the handlebar adjusts the pedal assist levels (up and down arrows) and cycles through the display settings (center button).

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike control pad

Here is a look at the Raleigh lock on grip, front Shimano M365 hydraulic disc brake lever, and Brose control pad. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike shimano brake lever

On the right side of the handlebars is the Shimano M365 hydraulic brake lever and the Shimano Deore 10 speed shifter. The reach of the brake levers can be adjusted with an allen wrench to fit your hand size properly. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike shifter

Here’s a look at the paddles of the Shimano Deore 10 speed shifter and the Raleigh lock on grip. The grips have a very solid and stable feel. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike shimano derailleur

A Shimano Deore rear derailleur shifts through the 10 speed Shimano 11-32T cogset. The gearing range works well for cruising up to 28 mph and for climbing steep hills. A rear thru axle provides for solid side to side stiffness of the rear wheel.  

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike front disc brake

Shimano M365 hydraulic discs brakes are used front and rear. The front disc is a 180mm diameter rotor. These hydraulic brakes have a very solid feel with progressive modulation. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike rear disc brake

Here is the rear Shimano M365 hydraulic disc brake with 160mm rotor and a look at the quick release for the rear wheel through axle. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike front tire

The Schwalbe Big Ben 27.5″ x 2.0″ tires have nice tread pattern for an efficient ride with channels for dissipating water. These tires have significant air volume for a smooth and comfortable ride. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike pedals

Wide alloy pedals provide a stable platform and solid grip. 

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike seat

The Velo Raleigh saddle has a narrow performance style profile.

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike 1

Raleigh Redux iE Electric Bike Specifications

Frame: Double butted 6061 aluminium frame with hydroformed tubing, smoothed welds, rear through axle, rack and fender connections

Fork: Aluminium fork with through axle and fender/rack connections

Motor: Brose mid-drive 250W with 90 Nm of peak torque  

Battery: 36V 13.8Ah (496.8 watt hour) lithium battery. The battery weighs 6.7 pounds. 

Assist Options: 3 pedal assist levels: Cruise, Tour, Sport. Torque sensor pedal assist

Speed: Pedal assist (no throttle) up to 28 mph which makes this a Class 3 eBike

Display: Brose LCD display with information on: pedal assist level (there are 3 levels), speedometer, odometer, trip odometer, battery level, trip time, trip average speed, and current time. Backlit for good visibility both day and night. 

Drivetrain: 44T chainring with Shimano 11-32T 10-speed cogset.  Shimano Deore 10 speed shifter & rear derailleur

Brakeset: Shimano M365 hydraulic disc brakes, 180mm front rotor and 160mm rear rotor

Tires: Schwalbe Big Ben, 27.5″ x 2.0″

Sizes: Small (5′-3″ to 5′-6″),  Medium (5′-6″ to 5′-9″) Large (5′-9″ to 6′-0″)

Accessories: Kickstand

Colors: Black

Weight: 47.7 pounds. 41.0 pounds with the battery removed.

Price: $3,199 USD at the time of this review

Here is a link to the specifications page of the Raleigh Redux iE electric bike.

Raleigh Redux iE electric bike 2

Stay tuned for part 2 of the Raleigh Redux iE review with info on the ride characteristics, the range test, pros, cons, and overall thoughts!

-Pete

Review Note: Each company pays a fee for a review on Electric Bike Report because of the considerable amount of time that it takes to provide an in-depth review of each eBike. A lot of time is spent on the full range test with distance & elevation profile, the wide variety of detailed pictures, in-depth video, and the write up with the specifications, ride characteristics, pros, cons, and overall thoughts. The reviews on Electric Bike Report are focused on providing you with a detailed “virtual” look at each eBike to help you determine if it is the eBike for you or not.

P.S. Don’t forget to join the Electric Bike Report community for updates from the electric bike world, plus ebike riding and maintenance tips!

Comments

  1. says

    The problem with all of these mid-drives is that they introduce new multiple points of failure into the drive train. The chains, the cassettes, the derailleurs have not been designed for the 90 NM of torque applied, plus the amount of force the human leg can exert. (average rider is 50 NM, but instantaneously the force can be more than double that from professional riders). The mid drive introduces many internal elements in the motor, that have not been well proven in these design conditions on a bike, where there is both external force from the rider, plus counter-acting forces from the wheel, chain, cassette, derailleur. The engineering required to make both cadence and torque sensing work properly, and to do so over time in a reliable fashion, also is quite costly. To properly design for all these new points of mechanical and dynamic machinery and electronics adds considerable cost, which is the opposite direction the market needs to go for wider adoption within the market place. The benefit versus a rear wheel hub design, is thus marginal, and over the longer term has yet to be proven. If the e-bike designers, and OEMs aren’t careful, they will quickly sabotage themselves and impede the market here in the US, which is quite different from every other market world wide. There is a very small commuter contingent here, and its not growing due to lack of appropriate infrastructure, and the domination of auto’s. Therefore the higher prices over $2000 to $2500 are rarely justifiable for the still infrequent use of e-bikes here by the typical recreational user who is attracted to them due to age or physical limitations or simply the novelty of the experience. Sure right now as the industry is nascent and very much in the very early adopter stage, the industry will find consumers willing to shell out $3000 to $5000 for one of these, but that will remain a very limited niche consumer base at very low numbers. That relatively low number of US sales (vs Europe for example) will persist for years in the low hundreds of thousands of units annually if these e-bike OEMs don’t get the price vs utilization proposition right. Will the Raleigh is interesting, it doesn’t really excite at that price point. Striving to build a quality e-bike at lower price points should be the goal – not introducing more technology at higher price points.

  2. Electric Pete says

    So why are all the e-bike manufacturers following Henry Fords lead- “You can have it an any color you want as long as its BLACK.”

    We need bright colors to increase visibility when riding bikes on the roads and paths.

    But this Raleigh did catch my eye. Looks good.

    Oh yeah, almost every article I read always mentions the absence of a water bottle cage. Why has this been overlooked for so long?

  3. Charles says

    I just bought this bike at Electric Bikes of New England ( a great place to buy an ebike BTW). I rode all kinds of bikes. Stromer, Bulls, iZip, etc. The Redux IE was the lightest and the most powerful of the lot. Great feel and handling. I can’t wait for your Part 2.

  4. Ian Golding says

    Loved seeing a half decent design peddle coming from the original great firm Raleigh.

    Have to say I agree with comments on the price point and lack of imagination regarding colour.

    From a UK point of view even more frustrated by the UK dumbing down on the top speed (from 28 to 15mph)

    If anybody knows a legal way round this I would be interested to have their thoughts.

    Having said all that I love my Scott/Bosch E Sub Tour e bike.

    Very useful magazine.

    Thanks

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